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Are you a real cowboy?

Are you a real cowboy?

This Texas Agriculture Talks post was originally published on Jan. 21, 2013.

By Mike Barnett

Cowboys: Real deal or pseudo? How do you tell?

I thought about that over the weekend as I settled on the movie Urban Cowboy while flipping channels on the tube.

“Are you a real cowboy?” Sissy, played by Debra Winger, asked.

“Well, that depends on what you think a real cowboy is,” answered Bud, portrayed by a young John Travolta.

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Agricultural technology is a partner of the human race

Agricultural technology is a partner of the human race

By Gene Hall

I love making lists and writing about lists of accomplishments and great deeds. I can hardly wait during college football season for the “Top 25.”

I don’t know how I missed this list more than a year ago in The Atlantic detailing the top 50 breakthroughs  since the wheel.

Very correctly, I think, the top three on the list are the printing press, electricity and penicillin. Agriculture is also prominent on this list:

No. 6—Some say paper was an agricultural crop. It certainly is today. It’s what made the printing press—and mass communication—work.

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5 reasons to support the GMO labeling act

5 reasons to support the GMO labeling act

By Mike Barnett

Watching the anti-GMO forces rally against the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act, recently passed by the House Agriculture Committee, reminds me of a dog chasing its tail.

They whirl with unexplainable passion in pursuit of an elusive goal. The end, pardon the pun, is always in sight. But it is never achieved.

It’s disconcerting to me. The anti-GMO forces have worked through many states to get mandatory labeling of GMO products. They’ve been successful in Vermont.

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Remembering a celebration of science and technology

Remembering a celebration of science and technology

By Gene Hall

When I was in the eighth grade, my father loaned me his copy of The 1949 Yearbook of Agriculture–“Trees”–to prepare for a 4-H forestry judging contest. It helped our team win third place. When published by the Department of Agriculture, the yearbook devoted a substantial volume to a single subject of research or agricultural science.

When I left for a job with the Texas Farm Bureau in 1977, Dad gifted me his entire collection of USDA yearbooks. I’ve added to it over the years and received some gifts of hard-to-find volumes. I now own every year from 1932 until publication ceased in 1992. There are also volumes from 1896, 1918 and 1919. I’ll continue to collect them. Everyone has to have a hobby.

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How to keep your farm girl happy

How to keep your farm girl happy

By Mike Barnett

How to keep your girl happy. It’s trending on Twitter right now.

And I’m nothing if I’m not trendy. So I decided I better jump into the conversation before it’s too late.

But with a twist. I have a few suggestions on how to keep your farm girl happy. After all, everyone can use a little help in this area.

Here’s the top 10 ways:

10. Whisper sweet nothings in her ear. Like at midnight. Nuzzle her neck. Move up to her ear. And in your sexiest voice, ask her to get up and see if that calf is born yet.

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A strong voice for our future

A strong voice for our future

By Russell W. Boening
Texas Farm Bureau President

From drought to drenched.

In May, 13.5 trillion gallons of rain fell across Texas. Enough to cover the state in eight inches of water and setting the record for the wettest May in the Lone Star State.

The rain came in waves, testing the resolve of Texas farmers and ranchers. It flooded crops and pastures, tore down fences and destroyed roads. But it filled stock tanks, brought renewed life to drought-stricken land and replenished reservoirs.

A mixed blessing for Texans.

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