hair loss problem

content top

Same interests, new location

Same interests, new location

By Gene Hall

Change is good. A chance to update and refresh is exactly what’s needed every now and then.

That time has come for Texas Agriculture Talks. This column represents the final new entry of the long-running blog. We hope you’ve enjoyed reading and reacting to Texas Agriculture Talks as much as we’ve enjoyed crafting the columns over the years.

When Mike Barnett and I started Texas Agriculture Talks 10 years ago, our goal was to challenge the “conventional wisdom” on agricultural issues. Mike is enjoying his retirement now, but he has my thanks for his tremendous contributions on this groundbreaking blog.

Read More

FFA: Meeting the future

FFA: Meeting the future

By Gene Hall

A smoky haze hangs over the auditorium of the Dallas Convention Center. The main arena is packed with high school kids. They’re making noise, quite a lot of noise, but there’s no trouble. Light and sound crash together in a cacophony of recorded country music with some hip-hop thrown in. A blue corduroy conga line snakes past me down the aisle. The strains of YMCA, complete with hand signals, pulsate from thousands of young throats.

Read More

Vegan dogs? Anti-meaters are trying too hard!

Vegan dogs? Anti-meaters are trying too hard!

By Gene Hall

I love sports—most of them anyway. I’m into everything about the culture of football, baseball and most other events that call for the athletic manipulation of a ball. And I especially like the food. The ginormous pretzels, peanuts, popcorn, crackerjack and various beverages of choice. Corny dogs, hot dogs and vegan dogs. The smells are intoxicating. No wait, what? “Vegan dogs?” Someone is pulling our leg! Sadly, no. An $8 vegan dog was at the Super Bowl, and was labeled that mega event’s most hated snack. No long lines there. No sir.

Read More

In agriculture, labels matter—until they don’t

In agriculture, labels matter—until they don’t

By Gene Hall

In my more cynical moments, I suspect that the great confusion and controversy surrounding agriculture today is on purpose.

In this mindset, I can easily conclude that those organizations that survive by demonizing modern agriculture manipulate the language and the labels to suit their own purposes. In this way, passions are inflamed. Money is raised. A public is misled. Calling you “Big Ag” could mean “Big Bucks” for me even though all I’ve contributed to the debate are a couple of politically charged words.

Read More

An agricultural view of the race for the White House

An agricultural view of the race for the White House

By Gene Hall

The following views are my own. Neither my employer, Texas Farm Bureau, nor its AGFUND PAC has ever endorsed a candidate for president. As an ag writer for most of four decades, I am compelled to ask myself, “What kind of candidate would be good for agriculture?” This is not, however, an endorsement or even a hint of one.

An affinity for agriculture issues would help, as would an understanding of farm and ranch people. Farm and ranch families now comprise less than two percent of the population. Leadership pragmatic enough to listen and compromise on agricultural legislation is the only way anything to do with agriculture even gets a vote.

Read More
content top