hair loss problem

content top

Growing Texas sustainably

Growing Texas sustainably

By Russell Boening
Texas Farm Bureau President

On the farm or in town, agriculture grows Texas. Sustainably.

From the fruit and vegetable farms in the Rio Grande Valley to the world’s largest cotton patch in the South Plains. Consider the nursery and landscape businesses in East Texas, combined with vast pastures in Central and West Texas. Farmers and ranchers are doing more with less.

They’re farming with an eye to the future. Texas’ future.

That’s sustainability, and it’s nothing new for farmers and ranchers. We’ve been doing it for five generations or more.

Read More

A note to consumers from Agriculture

A note to consumers from Agriculture

Hi,

I am Agriculture, and I get a day of my own on March 15.

I’d like to introduce myself for anyone who may not know who I am.

I’m responsible for food and fiber production. I not only supply these necessities for the citizens of the U.S., but I’m also shipped all over the world. I raise beef, pork, chicken, milk, vegetables, fruit, nuts and grains for humans and animals. I also grow cotton for clothes, timber to build things—like your house and many other products—that keep us healthy and strong, individually and as a nation.

Read More

Leadership and action will take us places

Leadership and action will take us places

By Russell Boening

These are excerpts from President Russell Boening’s address at the organization’s 82nd annual meeting in Arlington.

Texas Farm Bureau has demonstrated the ability to unite the farm and ranch families of Texas, in effect creating another kind of family—a people united by a common bond of belief and of mutual interest.

You’ve witnessed the organization working for Texas agriculture and many of you have been part of that.

We strengthened eminent domain laws. We’ve come a long way, but there is more to be done.

Read More

Legal clouds still hang over the Red River

Legal clouds still hang over the Red River

By Russell Boening

A lawsuit filed recently on behalf of landowners and county officials by the Texas Public Policy Foundation is the latest attempt to recover private property claimed by the federal government along the Texas-Oklahoma border. The lead plaintiff in the lawsuit is Wilbarger County farmer and rancher Ken Aderholt.

Just a few weeks ago, I visited the Red River area where the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) still claims as many as 30,000 acres of family farms, homes and other private property. I received briefings on the situation as I toured the area.

Read More

GMOs are saving Hawaiian farms and forests from extinction

GMOs are saving Hawaiian farms and forests from extinction

By Joni Kamiya

More evidence is cropping up all the time to support the environmentally friendly nature of biotech seeds and crops. As we’ve learned in Hawaii, GM papayas are a great example of how biotechnology keeps forests intact and decreases the amount of pesticides needed to grow marketable fruits. I call this “GMOrganic” because it’s earth-friendly, farmer-friendly and good for the consumer.

Our three-generation farm has been growing papayas since the 1960s and continues to grow this delicious, highly sought after Hawaiian staple. The papaya is a fruit that many locals buy religiously, every week for years. But for a long time, this local favorite was under constant threat.

Read More
content top