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Texas is ‘officially’ a disaster

Texas is ‘officially’ a disaster

By Amanda Hill

USDA has confirmed what Texas farmers and ranchers have known for a long, long time… Texas is a disaster.

On Tuesday, the USDA declared the entire state of Texas a natural disaster area. Of 254 drought-stricken Texas counties, 213 were named “primary” natural disaster areas, and the remaining 41 contiguous counties also qualify for emergency assistance.

With more than 3 million acres burned, crops destroyed and animals suffering—it’s about time.

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Saying Thank You in a Time of Tragedy

Saying Thank You in a Time of Tragedy

By Matt Felder

Traveling around the state this year I have seen one of Mother Nature’s greatest furies. Wildfires have consumed much of Texas and have not discriminated on where or when to spark. North, South, East, West and Central—all parts of Texas are burning.

Since the wildfire season ignited in mid-November, more than 12,779 fires have burned more than 3,251,365 acres. Those numbers increase every day.

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Seeds of hope lie in wildfire despair

Texas WildfiresBy Mike Barnett

Texans have looked into the eye of a firestorm this spring as wildfires ravage the Lone Star State.

Nearly 2 million acres have charred as severe drought tightens its grip. Howling winds and soaring temperatures contribute to a tenuous situation.

Firefighters have died, houses have burned, livestock has been killed and livelihoods have been lost. Fire crews continue desperate battles in parts of Texas. There is no relief in sight.

Yet, even as ranchers struggle to save their land, homes and cattle, they have not given way to despair. It will rain. Someday. And when it does, Mother Nature will give back what she took away.

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Prices mean nothing to farmers if it doesn’t rain

By Gene Hall

Texas Farm Bureau:Prices mean nothing to farmers if it doesn’t rain

I heard it again at a civic club meeting just this week: “Wow, farmers must be making a killing with these commodity prices so high.” This comment came from a friend who knows I work for farmers. I’ve heard it dozens of times during this recent and historic escalation of most commodity prices. It’s a quick, top of mind question that takes less than 10 seconds to ask. It takes several minutes to answer properly.

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Will 2010 be any better?

 

Texas Farm BureauBy Gene Hall

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