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City fresh is the key to success for Springdale Farm

City fresh is the key to success for Springdale Farm

By Mike Barnett

City fresh.

That’s the idea behind Springdale Farm, a five-acre agricultural oasis in the heart of Austin.

Owners Glenn and Paula Foore have planted seeds to support a growing local food movement in the deep, rich soils of the Colorado River bottoms, located in an East Austin neighborhood just three miles from the State Capitol. Landscapers by trade, the Foores started growing food in 2009 when the local economy turned south.

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Two cents is an investment in food security

Two cents is an investment in food security

By Mike Barnett

Two cents.  That’s what Americans invest per meal for a viable crop insurance program, the risk management tool used by farmers to protect themselves from the whims of Mother Nature.

That cost per meal—according to a news release by Crop Insurance in America—is derived from the Congressional Budget Office’s projected crop insurance program outlays, the Census Bureau’s projections of U.S. population, the Department of Commerce’s data on consumption spending on food, and the assumption that people eat three meals per day.

Some would call this two cents per meal a subsidy. I couldn’t argue against that, although I prefer to call it an investment.

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A walk through the birthing barn

A walk through the birthing barn

By Jessica Domel

I’m of the opinion that there’s nothing quite like a livestock show and rodeo. I’ve only been to a few in my life, but I have to say, there’s something about standing under the bright lights with my boots crunching fresh hay while the aroma of freshly cooked hot dogs fills the air. The sounds of children’s excitement as they crowd around a display of freshly-hatched chicks is just intoxicating.I forget how exciting it can be to see those first few moments of life, and I have to tell you, it’s something to behold.

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Farming is my family business

Farming is my family business

By Darrell Bowers

I am a farmer. It’s what I am and what I’ve always wanted to be. It is a family business. In fact, agriculture today is kind of difficult to get into without a family history of it.

My name is Darrell Bowers, and I appreciate this chance to talk to my customers and Texas neighbors. I farm near Victoria, Texas, and I am 30 years old. I am married and have two children. The Texas Farm Bureau has chosen this week to make a special effort to connect with the people who are our customers. We call it Texas Food Connection Week. I appreciate you!

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Family farmer: Who decides?

Family farmer: Who decides?

By Suzie Wilde

I kiss a family farmer.

Some of the land he farms has been in his family for almost 100 years. He does all the work himself at this point in his farming career, except for harvest time when two or three other folks have to help. Often those are even all family members, including his town-dwelling wife, at times. (I can pack a pretty tight module, if I do say so myself.) But lately I have come to realize that many of those out there who are critics of farming think that the farmer I kiss should not be allowed to be called a family farmer. They think that he has too much land, too many tractors, a barn that is too big… They contend that he is “big ag” or “corporate farming.”

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