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Farmers, fight the good fight…just not with each other!

Texas Farm BureauBy Mike Barnett

I call it the great divide in agriculture.

I’m speaking of the differences in the many methods of farming and ranching and how each method has been pitted against the other.

For example, grass fed versus grain fed beef.  It’s been ugly over the years as the merits have been debated on why one is better than the other.

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When it comes to food choice, the consumer is king

Texas Farm Bureau:

By Gene Hall

I have written several times in the space about what I call the “big tent of American agriculture.” What I am attempting to describe is a food production machine that is capable of turning out great volume of food and fiber, while addressing the diversity of choice that American consumers demand.

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What I’ve learned from blogging (and Facebook) Part II

Texas Farm Bureau: What I’ve learned from blogging (and Facebook) Part II

By Gene Hall

It has been an interesting progression for Mike Barnett and me as we have made a transition of sorts from old school agricultural journalists to bloggers, Facebookers and Tweeters. One of my Farm Bureau friends in Washington D.C. referred to us as “the angry dudes from Texas.” He meant that in jest—I think. We do try to write with a little bit of attitude and generate a little controversy. Let’s face it. Some of these issues ARE controversial. Things I’ve believed to be pretty much settled with regard to science are the devil’s spawn to others. I’m not really angry though. I admit to being a little frustrated as we take these tentative first steps down this new channel of communication.

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Organic vs. industrial, cage eggs vs. free-range: We’re all in this together

Texas Agriculture...Organic vs. Indusrial Agriculture

By Mike Barnett

Which came first…the chicken or the free-range egg?

And does it matter?

A recent survey from Information Resources Inc (IRI), which tracks checkout scanner transactions from 34,000 grocery and other retail stores in the United States, shows that 92 percent of eggs purchased by consumers in 2009 were from cage operations, 2 percent were from cage-free operations and 1 percent were from free-range/organic operations. The remaining 5 percent of eggs were other specialty eggs. Percentages were unchanged from 2008.

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