hair loss problem

content top

Save the Monarch butterfly

Save the Monarch butterfly

By Gary Joiner

They’re back! The annual Monarch butterfly migration has arrived. “There were literally thousands, coming in big and small bands like snow flurries…” is how one Concho Valley resident described the return.

Monarchs are moving down from northern latitudes. Their destination is overwintering sites in Mexico. Texas is the only state that all Monarchs must cross. And we’re seeing peak migration now. The Monarch is the only butterfly known to make a two-way migration as birds do. Some fly as far as 3,000 miles to reach their winter home.

Read More

A farmer’s view of the Clean Water Act

A farmer’s view of the Clean Water Act

By Russell Boening
TFB President

As a fourth generation farmer in South Texas, you could say that I make my living with water. My crops will not grow without it. Our dairy cows will not give milk without enough fresh, clean water.

I use what we call “best management practices,” meaning that we comply with label directions, use conservation methods and other tools of modern agriculture. We also plant biotech crops. That means we use fewer and smaller amounts of chemicals than we needed two decades ago.

Read More

Profit is not a four-letter word

Profit is not a four-letter word

This blog was originally posted on Dec. 10, 2012. 

By Mike Barnett

Your profitability as a farmer or rancher ranks low on the list of concerns of those who consume your products. I call them customers.

I’ve noted this fact in a survey or two and was reminded of it the other day when a Facebook friend posted some tidbits he had read from an article in the excellent publication Livestock Weekly.

According to the article, consumers believe the priorities for those farmers and ranchers who genuinely try to make a living from agriculture should, from first to last, be:

Read More

A strong voice for our future

A strong voice for our future

By Russell W. Boening
Texas Farm Bureau President

From drought to drenched.

In May, 13.5 trillion gallons of rain fell across Texas. Enough to cover the state in eight inches of water and setting the record for the wettest May in the Lone Star State.

The rain came in waves, testing the resolve of Texas farmers and ranchers. It flooded crops and pastures, tore down fences and destroyed roads. But it filled stock tanks, brought renewed life to drought-stricken land and replenished reservoirs.

A mixed blessing for Texans.

Read More

10 things farmers do when it rains

10 things farmers do when it rains

By Mike Barnett

And the rains came. And came. And came.

After months of speculation, weather experts announced El Niño is here. Last Friday. Ha! Texas farmers and ranchers could have made that announcement two months ago.

At least farmers and ranchers have a sense of humor. Because it’s a dire situation. One of my Facebook farmer friends posted a photo of him standing on the bow of a sailboat, scanning the horizon of a deep blue ocean. His caption: “Checking wheat this morning.”

Read More
content top