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Who cares about water in Texas?

Who cares about water in Texas?

By Mike Barnett

So who cares about water in Texas? Farmers and ranchers, obviously. The rest of the state? Not so much.

At least that’s the conclusion faculty members at the University of Texas made after examining public opinion polls of issues that matter most to Texans.

The economy, immigration and education are top of mind for most. Yet water—that life-giving resource—registers as a top issue with only 4 percent.

That’s a real concern.

Rural Texans understand burn bans, dry wells and short pastures. Drought is not a word. It is a reality they live with every day.

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Education efforts needed in U.S. Senate race

Education efforts needed in U.S. Senate race

By Steve Pringle

The runoff is over and the candidate Texas Farm Bureau AGFUND backed lost. That means either Republican Ted Cruz or Democrat Paul Sadler will represent the Lone Star State as U.S. Senator after the November election.

We have work to do.

From what I’m hearing, neither candidate is paying much attention to agriculture. Let me give you a couple of reasons to reach out and grab their attention:

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Stewards of the land

Stewards of the land

By Si Cook

This picture was taken on a piece of ground that I like to call “mine.” The oak tree has been standing there for probably a couple of centuries, oblivious to who “owns” the ground in which it is rooted.

As I considered this, reality set in and I came back to my senses. I really do not own anything in this picture. The good Lord is simply allowing me to take care of a part of His creation for a short time. My goal is to be a good steward and to leave what has been entrusted to me in better shape than when I found it.

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Family farmer: Who decides?

Family farmer: Who decides?

By Suzie Wilde

I kiss a family farmer.

Some of the land he farms has been in his family for almost 100 years. He does all the work himself at this point in his farming career, except for harvest time when two or three other folks have to help. Often those are even all family members, including his town-dwelling wife, at times. (I can pack a pretty tight module, if I do say so myself.) But lately I have come to realize that many of those out there who are critics of farming think that the farmer I kiss should not be allowed to be called a family farmer. They think that he has too much land, too many tractors, a barn that is too big… They contend that he is “big ag” or “corporate farming.”

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The Enemy Above: The sun’s toll on farmers and ranchers

The Enemy Above: The sun’s toll on farmers and ranchers

By Gene Hall

Farmers and ranchers could not operate without the life-giving rays of the sun.  Photosynthesis, the chemical process by which plants nourish themselves, could not take place without it.  However, the sun can also bring misery, disease and even death, though all of this is ultimately preventable.  Heat and ultraviolet solar rays can take a devastating toll on crops and livestock.  The farm or ranch family can also be afflicted with serious problems, too.

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