hair loss problem

content top

Water: Every drop counts as this drought in Texas continues

Water: Every drop counts as this drought in Texas continues

By Mike Barnett

With no end in sight for this devastating Texas drought, water is becoming a scarce commodity. Repercussions are escalating.

Agriculture has already been hit with over $5.4 billion in direct losses because of this drought in Texas. As water runs short across the state, restrictions are imposed on farmers and ranchers to stretch supplies for our urban neighbors.

Read More

Drought in Texas reminds us that water controls our destinies

Drought in Texas reminds us that water controls our destinies

By Mike Barnett

The scars of this epic drought in Texas will run deep and serve as a reminder—long after the rain falls again—that water controls the destiny of the Lone Star State.

It’s been a year of records, all of which would better remain unbroken. We’re in the driest 10-month stretch since recordkeeping began. In my hometown of Waco, we saw the longest stretch of consecutive 100-plus degree days ever recorded. We’ve also suffered through the most 100-degree days in a year’s time, with another heat record set almost daily. There is no rain in sight.

Read More

Do you hate modern agriculture?

Do you hate modern agriculture?

By Gene Hall

The internet gives us many opportunities to express ourselves. Some do this with emotional afterburners on high, and if we don’t have to post our name, sometimes we can get pretty ugly. I have a few scars from these kinds of exchanges since I began blogging with Mike Barnett two years ago, but I heal pretty quickly.

Once in awhile, I like to analyze what we talk about in defense of agriculture. We do defend modern agriculture, but we try not to be defensive. Above all, we don’t want to disrespect other, alternative means of producing food and fiber or the opinions of others.

Read More

Drought in Texas is forcing a rethink on water use

Drought in Texas is forcing a rethink on water use

By Mike Barnett

There’s nothing like a drought in Texas to get folks thinking about water.

It’s constantly on the minds of farmers and ranchers. Failed crops, burnt pastures, empty ponds and hungry livestock are regular reminders of the last eight months, the driest stretch for this time period on record. Little moisture means no paycheck for many in agriculture this year.

For Texans in the city, it’s a different story. Water is an unlimited resource. We keep our lawns lush, golf courses green, cars shining and swimming pools filled. Water magically appears when we turn on the faucet. I should know better. But I plead guilty.

Read More

Texas Farm Bureau’s time is now

Kenneth Dierschke, President, Texas Farm BureauThe following excerpt is from President Kenneth Dierschke’s address to convention delegates during TFB’s 77th annual meeting Dec. 5 in Waco.
For the Texas Farm Bureau—for the people who grow our food—this is a crucial time.

It is a time of potential danger and enormous expectations, a time of great challenge and potential reward. It is a time to harvest that which has been sown by generations of our members and leaders. 

This is Texas Farm Bureau’s time—if we have the will to make it happen.

Read More
content top